JWPlayer is one the most known video players (if not the most one) and today we’re going to learn how to track it using GTM (Google Tag Manager). This time we’re going to use an agnostic dataLayer pushes instead of the ones that we usually use for Google Analytics. 

We’ll be using one tag, one trigger and one variable, and in the next list we’re resuming all the events that our code will … Lee el resto de la entrada

The spam referrals problem in Google Analytics is turning into the new “not provided”. Almost everyone I follow has posted/retweeted/said something about it in the past month. I didn’t want to miss this oportunity to bring back some of the scripts I did in the past year for myself and share it with everyone. So in this post I’m going to try to address the Spam problem from another perspective that is not based … Lee el resto de la entrada

One of those posts that were laying around on my drafts and that I’ve decided to publish. I know there’re out there some good and well stablished tools that helps you to debug your Google Tag Manager implementation like the dataSlayer extension. But in the previous months I’ve been using a little JavaScript snippet that allows me to view in easy way the pushes that are being sent to Google Analytics in real-time in … Lee el resto de la entrada

As we all know (do we?) Google Analytics uses cookies in order to work. This is, if for some reason the cookie can’t be set it won’t give any error but hits won’t be fired at all. A cookie is usually set for a FQHN (Fully Qualified Host Name). So if for example we’re going to track our intranet and we access it using an URL like : http://intranet/ Google Analytics is likely not … Lee el resto de la entrada

Univeral Analytics tracking is based on cookies and on a randomly generated clientId. Yep, that’s it. Each time you visit a site using Google Analytics for the first time a new cookie is set in your browser with a randomly generated hash (clientId), that will be used by Google Analytics servers to identificate you in the subsecuent visits.

Let’s see how the cookie looks:

crossdomain_universal

Any of those values can be modified using the … Lee el resto de la entrada

  (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){
  (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o),
  m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m)
  })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga');

  ga('create', 'UA-123123123', 'auto');
  ga('send', 'pageview');

The first thing that may attract your attention is the function parameters, they look like a real word. Let start talking about what an “isogram” is, according to the wikipedia:

An isogram (also known as a “nonpattern word”) is a logological term for a word or phrase without a repeating letter.

i,s,o,g,r,a,m are the variables names being used in the Universal Analytics Tracking Lee el resto de la entrada

Last day we were talking about how to measure if our site was showing a responsive layout to our users, and today we’re going to expand that tracking post with orientation tracking for our sites.

We could use the Media Queries to match the orientation, but as this is not much standard we’re going to use the window.orientation value and the viewPort Width and Height values to guess the current page orientation and pass that … Lee el resto de la entrada

Every day more sites choose to use a responsive designs for their new sites, making it somekind difficult to track what version of our page is being showed to the user (as all we may now, browser detection is not perfect at all, most of them are based on the User Agent that can be easily faked).

This post will try to show you the different ways to track if user’s are viewing a responsive … Lee el resto de la entrada

I don’t really know if this is happening users using different ISP’s but starting from today I’ve noticed that all my requests to www.google-analytics.com were being served from a not usual but familiar IP address range, and the response time was just 9ms. Hey just a great improvement from the 42ms of average I’m usually getting from Google Analytics servers.

thyngster@hq:~$ ping www.google-analytics.com
PING www-google-analytics.l.google.com (212.142.160.238) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from cache.google.com (212.142.160.238): 
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